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BBC.Tales.From.The.Green.Valley.09 of 12

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nimblehorse
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Published on 25 Nov 2021 / In History

⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣Tales from the Green Valley is a British historical documentary TV series in 12 parts, first shown on BBC Two from 19 August to 4 November 2005. The series, made for the BBC by independent production company Lion TV, follows historians and archaeologists as they recreate farm life from the age of the Stuarts; they wear the clothes, eat the food and use the tools, skills and technology of the 1620s.

The series recreates everyday life on a small farm in Wales in the period, using authentic replica equipment and clothing, original recipes and reconstructed building techniques. Much use is made of period sources such as agricultural writers Gervase Markham and Thomas Tusser.

The series features historians Stuart Peachey and Ruth Goodman, and archaeologists Alex Langlands, Peter Ginn and Chloe Spencer.

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pastprovespresent
pastprovespresent 2 days ago

They keep complaining about how their hands hurt. Why aren't they wearing gloves? Gloves have been around for thousands of years. I'm sure they had work gloves either made from felted wool or leather. Most likely a combination of the two. I know they are trying to play up the "poor peasant farmer", but even a peasant would have access to wool from all those sheep. They even mentioned the hat law, so the peasants could make money knitting hats. There must have been enough scraps left to fashion some work gloves.

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nimblehorse
nimblehorse 2 days ago

they are just soft and weak
our 16th century farmer forebears, were a hardy lot, their hands were like leather no doubt.

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pastprovespresent
pastprovespresent 2 days ago

I helped my great aunt churn butter as a kid. True, it probably takes more effort than the average person today would think of expending with all the electric appliances. I don't recall it being so greuling. I thought it was fun. The neighbor had a dairy farm, so we would walk over with milk canisters and get what we needed. It was raw milk a plenty in those days. Nobody was afraid of getting sick either. She says cream could be stored for six days in the winter? They said it was 4 below outside. If you set the canister outside, it would keep longer than that.

I enjoy watching these. I just wish they would show a little more in detail the old techniques. I suppose though for a general audience, they would get bored.

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nimblehorse
nimblehorse 2 days ago

yes, butter salted, would keep in winter...i have read about the scots highlanders serving rancid butter to travelers and thinking nothing of it..hard times, the idea of a sell by date, is meaningless.

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pastprovespresent
pastprovespresent 2 days ago

@nimblehorse But they have salt in Scotland. Why wouldn't they salt it and prevent it going rancid? It might go rancid in summer, but with the snow on the ground, even unslated, it should freeze outside which should prevent it going rancid, even unsalted. I'd imagine tourists prefer Scotland in the Summer, as it gets chilly up there in winter. Butter freezes and defrosts without issues. Milk and cream you can freez too.

Speaking of the hard times, yes, the Scots were forced to stop wearing tartans after the Battle of Colladon. I can't even tell you how many years or decades went buy before I understood that the Gauls wore the same tartans. Then dare I coun't the decades before I found out that the Yamanaya from the Paymar plateau in Asia wore the same tartans. They have been picking us off group by group and making our heritage illegal. I hope everybody stocks up, as I see many of the skills in these videos might be usefull in the near future.

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