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As advertised a few months back I have created a new website for more of a Free Speech Atmosphere, I will no longer allow FE Theory at WT.Online but will at Truth In The World Dot Com, I will not allow FE here as per the last few months and doubt that I ever will, I Loathe it mainly because of all the infighting it brings and a certain tribe is laughing at us because of it, Meanwhile they are up to the usual tricks while we squabble over something with Zero Relevance, Danke

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War of The Worlds by HG Wells - The Original 1938 Radio Broadcasts

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Published on 15 Apr 2022 / In Entertainment

⁣"The War of the Worlds" is an episode that is directed and narrated by Orson Welles as an adaptation of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds (1898) of the American radio drama anthology series The Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was performed and broadcast live as a Halloween episode at 8 pm ET on October 30, 1938, over the Columbia Broadcasting System radio network. The episode is famous for causing panic among its listening audience, though the scale of panic is disputed, as the program had relatively few listeners.

The episode opens with an introductory monologue based on the beginning of the original novel, after which the program takes on the format of an evening of typical radio programming being periodically interrupted by news bulletins. The first few bulletins interrupt a program of live music and are relatively calm reports of unusual explosions on Mars followed by a seemingly unrelated report of an object falling on a farm in Grover's Mill, New Jersey. The crisis escalates dramatically when a correspondent reporting live from Grover's Mill describes creatures emerging from an alien craft, which are incinerating police and onlookers with a heat ray until his audio feed abruptly goes dead. This is followed by a rapid series of news updates detailing the beginning of a devastating alien invasion and the military's futile efforts to stop it.

The first portion of the episode climaxes with another live report from the rooftop of a Manhattan radio station. The correspondent describes crowds fleeing clouds of poison smoke released by giant Martian "war machines" and "dropping like flies" as the gas approaches his location. Eventually he coughs and falls silent, and a lone ham radio operator asks, "Is there anyone on the air? Isn't there... anyone?" with no response. The program takes its first break thirty minutes after Welles's introduction.
The second half of the show shifts to a conventional radio drama format that follows a survivor (played by Welles) dealing with the aftermath of the invasion and the ongoing Martian occupation of Earth. The final segment lasts for about sixteen minutes, and like the original novel, concludes with the revelation that the Martians have been defeated by microbes rather than by humans. The broadcast ends with a brief "out of character" announcement by Welles in which he compares the show to "dressing up in a sheet and jumping out of a bush and saying 'boo!'"

Welles's "War of the Worlds" broadcast has become famous for convincing some of its listeners that a Martian invasion was actually taking place due to the "breaking news" style of storytelling employed in the first half of the show. The illusion of realism was supported by the Mercury Theatre on the Air's lack of commercial interruptions, which meant that the first break in the drama came after all of the alarming "news" reports had taken place. Popular legend holds that some of the radio audience may have been listening to The Chase and Sanborn Hour with Edgar Bergen and tuned in to "The War of the Worlds" during a musical interlude, thereby missing the clear introduction indicating that the show was a work of science fiction. Contemporary research suggests that this happened only in rare instances.

In the days after the adaptation, widespread outrage was expressed in the media. The program's news-bulletin format was described as deceptive by some newspapers and public figures, leading to an outcry against the broadcasters and calls for regulation by the FCC;officials declined to take any punitive action.

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